Book Scoop April 21- April 28, 2017

April 28, 2017
Book News, Links To Click, InToriLex, News, Book Scoop, Weekly Feature
Book Industry News, Links to Sift Through & Short Stories 

HEADLINES

'Between the World and Me' to be Adapted To Multimedia Performance

13 Year Old Pakistani Girl On Quest to Read the World

The Librarians of Native Hip Hop 

How E-books Lost Their Shine 

LA Times Book Prize Winners 2017

They Can't Kill Us All: Ferguson, Baltimore, and a New Era in America’s Racial Justice Movement
~Amazon~
Conducting hundreds of interviews during the course of over one year reporting on the ground, Washington Post writer Wesley Lowery traveled from Ferguson, Missouri, to Cleveland, Ohio; Charleston, South Carolina; and Baltimore, Maryland; and then back to Ferguson to uncover life inside the most heavily policed, if otherwise neglected, corners of America today.
In an effort to grasp the magnitude of the repose to Michael Brown's death and understand the scale of the problem police violence represents, Lowery speaks to Brown's family and the families of other victims other victims' families as well as local activists. By posing the question, "What does the loss of any one life mean to the rest of the nation?" Lowery examines the cumulative effect of decades of racially biased policing in segregated neighborhoods with failing schools, crumbling infrastructure and too few jobs.
Studded with moments of joy, and tragedy, They Can't Kill Us All offers a historically informed look at the standoff between the police and those they are sworn to protect, showing that civil unrest is just one tool of resistance in the broader struggle for justice. As Lowery brings vividly to life, the protests against police killings are also about the black community's long history on the receiving end of perceived and actual acts of injustice and discrimination. They Can't Kill Us All grapples with a persistent if also largely unexamined aspect of the otherwise transformative presidency of Barack Obama: the failure to deliver tangible security and opportunity to those Americans most in need of both.
They Can't Kill Us All is a galvanizing book that offers more than just behind-the-scenes coverage of the story of citizen resistance to police brutality. It will also explain where the movement came from, where it is headed and where it still has to go.

LINKS TO CLICK 

How to Start a Mother Daughter Book Club

13 Books We Wish We Could Read Right Now 

10 Contemporary Books About Teenagers for Adults

Sing, Unburied, Sing
~Amazon~
A searing and profound Southern odyssey by National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward.

In Jesmyn Ward's first novel since her National Book Award winning Salvage the Bones, this singular American writer brings the archetypal road novel into rural twenty-first-century America. Drawing on Morrison and Faulkner, The Odyssey and the Old Testament, Ward gives us an epochal story, a journey through Mississippi's past and present that is both an intimate portrait of a family and an epic tale of hope and struggle. Ward is a major American writer, multiply awarded and universally lauded, and in Sing, Unburied, Sing she is at the height of her powers.

Jojo and his toddler sister, Kayla, live with their grandparents, Mam and Pop, and the occasional presence of their drug-addicted mother, Leonie, on a farm on the Gulf Coast of Mississippi. Leonie is simultaneously tormented and comforted by visions of her dead brother, which only come to her when she's high; Mam is dying of cancer; and quiet, steady Pop tries to run the household and teach Jojo how to be a man. When the white father of Leonie's children is released from prison, she packs her kids and a friend into her car and sets out across the state for Parchman farm, the Mississippi State Penitentiary, on a journey rife with danger and promise.

Sing, Unburied, Sing grapples with the ugly truths at the heart of the American story and the power, and limitations, of the bonds of family. Rich with Ward's distinctive, musical language, Sing, Unburied, Sing is a majestic new work and an essential contribution to American literature.
Nikki Giovanni on Trusting Your Own Voice 

Ways Reading Makes Your life Better Everyday 

FEATURED SHORT STORY

“Her Thirty-seventh Year, an Index” by Suzanne Scanlon

Did I miss anything in the Book World this Week?

No comments:

Post a Comment

Thanks for Commenting I read and reply to all. Have a Great Day!!!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Copyright © 2015 In Tori Lex All Rights Reserved · All Logos & Trademark Belongs To Their Respective Owners | Design by These Paper Hearts
Back to Top